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Why Is My Dog Humping My Leg?, Peoria, AZ – Arrowhead Pooper Scoopers

It’s a little embarrassing when your dog decides to begin humping your leg, a pillow, or even another dog, even more so in the presence of company. This behavior is completely normal and it usually occurs when your dog becomes excited. You may notice that he, or she, exhibits this behavior more so when around other dogs. While it’s not abnormal, some dogs don’t appreciate being mounted by another dog and it might result in a fight.   Today, we will discuss why this behavior occurs and how to stop it.

As mentioned above, dogs get excited, especially when playing at a dog park with plenty of other dogs to play with. When you see your dog humping another dog, quickly remove your dog from the situation until he or she is calm. It’s important to remove your dog in the middle of the action so he or she understands why you are ending the unnecessary behavior. Don’t ever hit your dog if he or she exhibits a behavior you don’t approve of, always try to find another solution to the situation.

DOGS GET STRESSED

Dogs, just like their humans, get stressed, nervous or anxious. This is a common time to see them humping the throw pillows on your couch or on your bed. While it’s important to remove your dog from the situation, it’s critical for you to understand why your dog might be feeling the way he/she does at the moment. If your dog is anxious he/she might even pant or yawn. Call your veterinarian if you notice severe anxiety in your dog.

DOGS WANT ATTENTION

If your dog is humping your leg, or the leg of someone else, it’s a normal reaction to reach down and push the dog away. You might even pick up the dog and allow it to sit on your lap. When you do this however, you give the dog the attention he or she is craving. You are rewarding the dog for the behavior shown. If possible, walk away from your dog, ignore him, and certainly, don’t pick him up. Allow your dog to settle down in order to learn that is how he/she receives your attention.

DOGS ARE SOCIAL CREATURES

Dogs are animals that enjoy being social. Some dogs do better when they have another dog in the home to play with. It cuts down on anxiety and barking because you’re dog isn’t bored during the day while you might be at work. That being said, dogs often mount other dogs to decide who the dominant dog in the pack will be. While some dogs tolerate this behavior, others do not, and it often leads to fights between the dogs. In order to end this behavior, you’ll need to teach your dog to play nice while around other dogs. You might need the assistance of a dog trainer, who can teach and guide you, on how to properly socialize your dog.

DOGS FIND HUMPING MAKES THEM HAPPY

It doesn’t matter if your dog is spayed or neutered, boy or girl, all dogs, from time to time, will hump something. It might be a sexual behavior or it might just make your dog happy. If you find your dog in the act, quickly remove the object, or dog, that is making your dog behave this way. While removing him/her, tell them to “leave it.”

DOGS AND MEDICAL CONDITIONS

Urinary tract infections, or allergies, often cause dogs to hump, more so than usual. Your dog might also be suffering from a mental issue that is best left to your veterinarian to treat.

If you want to end your dogs’ behavior, you’ll need to be consistent, stopping the behavior each time you catch your dog in the act. If you’ve tried to no avail and the behavior just won’t stop, don’t hesitate to call your veterinarian. He or she might suggest a dog behavior therapist for you to speak with.

Thank you to http://www.akc.org for help in writing this post. See their website for more information on how to keep your dog happy and healthy.

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